Shoulder

Normal Anatomy of the Shoulder Joint

How does the Shoulder joint work?
Find out more in this web based movie.

print version


Rotator Cuff Tear

Rotator cuff is the group of tendons in the shoulder joint providing support and enabling wider range of motion. Major injury to these tendons may result in tear of these tendons and the condition is called as rotator cuff tear.

For more information about Rotator Cuff Tear click on below tabs.

Patient info print version


Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement is also called as swimmer’s shoulder, tennis shoulder, or rotator cuff tendinitis. It is the condition of inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder joint caused by motor vehicle accidents, trauma, and while playing sports such as tennis, baseball, swimming and weight lifting.

For more information about Shoulder Impingement click on below tabs.

Launch movie Patient info print version


Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder arthroscopy is a surgical procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into the shoulder joint. The benefits of arthroscopy are smaller incisions, faster healing, a more rapid recovery, and less scarring. Arthroscopic surgical procedures are often performed on an outpatient basis and the patient is able to return home on the same day.

For more information about Shoulder Arthroscopy click on below tabs.

Launch movie Patient info print version


Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder is the condition of painful shoulder limiting the movements because of pain and inflammation. It is also called as adhesive capsulitis and may progress to the state where an individual may feel very hard to move the shoulder.

For more information about Frozen Shoulder click on below tabs.

Launch movie Patient info print version


Shoulder Joint Replacement

Shoulder joint replacements are usually done to relieve pain and when all non-operative treatment to relieve pain has failed.

For more information about Shoulder Joint Replacement click on below tabs.

Patient info print version


Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability is a chronic condition that causes frequent dislocations of the shoulder joint. A dislocation occurs when the end of the humerus (the ball portion) partially or completely dislocates from the glenoid (the socket portion) of the shoulder. A partial dislocation is referred to as a subluxation whereas a complete separation is referred to as a dislocation.

For more information about Shoulder Instability click on below tabs.

Launch movie Patient info print version


Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

GET IN TOUCH

Request Appointment

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

COVID-19 Updates

Appointments

To provide options for our patients during these uncertain times, we are offering both in-office visits for new and established patients, and TeleHealth visits for our established patients.  To schedule an office visit or a TeleHealth visit, please call 619-299-8500, option 2.

Patient/Visitor Guideline Update

In an effort to minimize the risk of COVID transmission, provide a safer environment and promote social distancing, we are asking that patients avoid bringing visitors to their appointment. We are only allowing the patient into the waiting room and exam rooms. Additionally, we are respectfully asking that children not accompany any adult patient unless there is a medical necessity.

We are also requiring that any patient or visitor wear a face covering before entering our facility. Thank you for understanding and for helping us keep you and your greater community healthy.

Ensuring Your Safety

The safety of our patients and staff are top priority.  We are following strict disinfection protocols and continuously monitoring CDC guidelines and updates. We perform daily temperature checks on all staff and visitors, and require that staff members showing any symptoms stay at home to get well. We continue to monitor COVID-19 developments and alter our operations accordingly. 

As always, we appreciate our patients and thank you for your patience during this difficult time. We wish you and your families good health, now and always.